You searched for clothing | Basin Sports

686 Clothing Size Chart

Men’s 686 Clothing Size Chart

Body Measurements in Inches (“) and Centimeters (cm)

X-SMALL SMALL MEDIUM LARGE X-LARGE XX-LARGE
APPROXIMATE HEIGHT 5’5″ – 5’7″ 5’8″ – 5’10” 5’10” – 6’0″ 6’0″ – 6’2″ 6’1″ – 6’3″ 6’2″ – 6’5″
CM 165 – 170 173 – 178 178 – 183 183 – 188 186 – 191 188 – 196
CHEST 36″ – 38″ 38″ – 40″ 40″ – 42″ 42″ – 44″ 44″ – 46″ 46″ – 48″
CM 91 – 97 97 – 102 102 – 107 107 – 112 112 – 117 117 – 123
SLEEVE LENGTH** 33″ 34″ 35″ 36″ 37″ 38″
CM 84 86 89 91 94 97
LOW WAIST*** 28″ – 30″ 30″ – 32″ 32″ – 34″ 34″ – 36″ 36″ – 38″ 38″ – 40″
CM 71 – 76 76 – 81 81 – 86 86 – 91 91 – 97 97 – 102
HIP 34″ – 36″ 36″ – 38″ 38″ – 40″ 40″ – 42″ 42″ – 44″ 44″ – 46″
CM 86 – 91 91 – 97 97 – 102 102 – 107 107 – 112 112 – 117
INSEAM* 31″ 31.5″ 32″ 32.5″ 33″ 33.5″
CM 79 80 81 83 84 85

*Inseam measure from the crotch point to the ankle.
**Sleeve length is measured from center back neck to wrist.
***Low waist is 3″ down from natural waistline.

 

686 Mens Sizing Index
How to Find Your 686 Measurements

Posted on Leave a comment

Fall Into Fall With Winter Clothing: Men’s Edition

Fall Into Fall Prepared For Winter

 

Fall Into Fall

 

 

Don’t start of the winter season wrong, Fall Into Fall with the right men’s outerwear.  This week we focus on men’s ski jackets, choosing one jacket we find to be the most prominent for the 2015- 2016 ski season.  For many of you, you see me as the blogger/ social media guru.  What many don’t know is that I also lend a hand inputting ecommerce data into our online shopping site (www.basinshopping.com).  A small team and I are the ones writing descriptions for products. But I’m getting off topic, the point is that I see almost every product that comes into Basin Sports.  I see the specs, the dirty details and after seeing the model of a jacket I could tell you everything you’d want to know about it.

 

The Down and Dirty

 

Fall Into Fall

Which brings me to Mammut, in particular the Mammut Trift GTX 3L Parka.  This jacket has already won numerous skiers choice awards and is bound to win even more as the season progresses. It’s considered a parka because it’s a longer than average fit, so guys on the taller end of the spectrum will find it to fit better.  Anyone who wears it will tell you it’s roomy, and has a more freeride fit to it which isn’t a bad thing if you like that look.

Now before I go any further I’m going to explain what freeride means as a skier type and ski form and how the term Freeride has changed in the last couple of years.  Five years ago many associated freeride with park and pipe, meaning twin tip and extra baggy clothing and skiers with bad attitudes.  Freeride was associated with that- now not so much. I like to tell customers that Freeride is just another way to say all- mountain. In present day most skis have some form of rocker and twin tip design.  Yes, even your directional 85- 95mm ski, if bought in the last three years is going to most likely have some form of rocker and tail taper/rise to it.  That’s because having twin tip and rocker incorporated into a ski makes it easier to turn.  Freeride doesn’t necessarily mean freestyle either.  Freeride means I like to go off trail, hunt for powder and maybe send it off a jump or cliff, but I want to be able to lay it over on hard pack too.  That sounds like all- mountain doesn’t it? The point here is, that freeride is just another term form of all- mountain and the culture behind freeride doesn’t necessarily mean park and freestyle anymore.

 

 

Fall Into Fall

 

Tech Terms You’ll Find Interesting

 

GTX and 3L should be indicators of one thing, Gore- Tex.  The 3L stands for three layers, meaning you have 3 layers of Gore- Tex incorporated into the design so getting wet really isn’t a option.  I should also note that Mammut offers a cheaper price point version of this jacket with their own proprietary take on Gore- Tex. When it comes to water resistance, you get what you pay for so cheaper price point equals the lesser amount of time an item will take to become soaked.  Also remember water resistant and waterproof are two different things.Fall Into Fall

Most people find Gore- Tex to be the best because it’s the most water resistant fabric available, yet breathes and manages moisture more efficiently than any other comparable product on the market currently.  Normally a waterproof piece of apparel isn’t as breathable as a water resistant item. But, this jacket isn’t super advanced or jam packed with terms and jargon you barely understand. Yes, it has cool tech but it’s rather simple in design and is an honest to goodness ski jacket, built to protect you from the winter elements.

What You’re Getting:

  • You get extra-large pit venting systems with big zippers so you’re not fumbling around or having to take your gloves off, plus they’re two way so you can go up or down with the zippers.
  • Start thinking freeride equals big because you’re getting extra-large front pockets too.
  • Again, big zippers are key because no one enjoys pulling off gloves on the lift.
  • You also get a removable powder skirt and powder gaiters for the deep days.
  • Remember though, freeride has evolved into a similar form of all- mountain and is a moot point.

Freeride = All- Mountain

Closing Notes

Fall Into Fall

 

Bringing it back around, this is a freeride shell which means it’s not insulated (Shell equals not insulated).  It’s going to supremely manage moisture and block elements but it’s not insulated. That means you have to layer effectively to insulate properly. Don’t expect to solely wear this jacket and not much else and stay warm. We suggest the Mammut Aconcagua Light Fleece Jacket as a baselayer and the Mammut Mammut Eigerjoch Light Insulated Jacket.  These will complement the Mammut GTX 3L Parka very well.  So fall into fall right, fall into fall prepared for winter.

We’ll post links to where you can purchase the jacket online, but we’re in the process of updating our ecommerce site so bare with us.


Want to find out what events Basin has planned? Follow us on Facebook for the latest up to date plans or, subscribe to our email.

  • We can be reached 7 days a week at 802-422-3234
facebooktwitter-birdinstagramgoogleyou-tubepinterestlinkedinemail

 

 

Posted on Leave a comment

Fall Into Fall With Winter Clothing

Winter Clothing:

Women’s Edition Part II

Fall Into Fall
2016 Outdoor Research Paramour Ski Pant

In Part II of this edition of Fall Into Fall, we focus on Women’s pants.  The biggest issue noticed among women is whether to go insulated or just layer correctly.  Often a midweight insulated pant is perfect because it offers warmth but is still light enough that you can remain actively mobile. Outdoor Research is probably a brand you’ve never heard of and people are often turned away because they are not a recognizable brand.  But don’t be fooled, the name Outdoor Research in itself should be a good indicator of the quality of clothing they produce.  Always testing and perfecting outdoor clothing technologies, Outdoor Research combines tech seen in big name brands and sells it at an affordable price point.

 

 

2016 Outdoor Research Paramour Ski Pant
2016 Outdoor Research Paramour Ski Pant

 

 

The 2016 Outdoor Research Women’s Paramour Pant is the perfect combination of warmth and mobility, and the best part is- it’s only $225. It comes in two color options, Black and light blue.  No girly colors, nothing outrageous, just a reliable pant with simple options.  It’s made with double layer Pertex Shield which is just another form of Gore- Tex.  It’s a nylon, polyester mixes shell with synthetic insulation at the butt and knee areas.  Strategic Insulation as I like to call it.  It allows the body to breath but when you’re sitting on the chair lift on those bitter cold days you’ll often find your butt and thigh areas getting cold the quickest. It also has RECCO integrated into it suggesting light backcountry use is doable.  If you’re unfamiliar with RECCO, it is basically a sensor built into the pant to help avalanche beacons pick up your signal if you were to become trapped in an avalanche.

If you’re leggy like me, this pant will also have a better fit. The inseam is 34” in a medium and with a relaxed fit.  The best layering combination with this pant is a medium weight baselayer and then the pant.  No triple layering or stuffing just two layers and you’ll be good to go.

For the price point this pant is incredibly affordable and jam packed with technology that you’d find in other higher end clothing brands.  So don’t second guess Outdoor Research, Fall into Fall the right way, give them a shot and see why sometimes quality can come in smaller packages.

Want More Info? Call us at 802-422-3232.

Buy the Pant Here:

Click Here

 


 

Read Part I of Women’s Clothing Edition Here:

Click Here

 

facebooktwitter-birdinstagramgoogleyou-tubepinterestlinkedinemail

 

 

Posted on Leave a comment

Fall Into Fall: Winter Clothing Women’s Edition

Fall into Fall with the right winter clothing

Winter is Coming, are you ready?

IMG_1734

Fall into Fall with the right new gear.  In this blog we highlight the some of the new clothing options for the winter from some of our highlighted brands.  These are brands we find have something new and interesting for the 2016 season.  Though we only highlight a few, we have many other brands as well.

 

Arc’teryx Sentinel Jacket

Sentinel-Jacket-W-Chandra-Purple
Plum Purple Sentinel Jacket for Women.

It’s not just another jacket it’s something designed for the active women in mind.  The big mountain freerider crusher.  It’s a technical piece with a lot of potential that is if you know how to use it.  But, you don’t have to be a freeriding, aggressive skier either, you may just be the kind of gal who likes comfort and functionality in what they wear, and not necessarily wear something because it looks “cute” or “what’s in” for the season.  So why not fall into fall with a functional jacket designed for the ladies.

The Dirty Details:

Gore- Tex, you’ve heard it a million times but never fully understood it, right?  Well let’s try and work through the Gore- Tex concept then shall we? Gore-Tex by definition is,

“A synthetic waterproof fabric permeable to air and water vapor, used in outdoor and sports clothing.”

Fall-Into-Fall-Sentinel-Jacket-Women-s-Chamisa-Front-View
A full view of the Arc’Teryx Sentinel Jacket

Every company has their own form of Gore-Tex but the name itself is actually a company with a history of only providing the best quality product for outdoor enthusiasts.  In the Sentinel the Gore- Tex used is called N70p fabric. If you read hang tags on jackets with Gore-Tex technology you’ll often see that same name with different numbers.  Much like primaloft measured in grams the “fabric tag” establishes weight and stitching thickness.  Most 3 layer jackets like the Sentinel are made with N70p Gore-Tex.  What this means is that you’re getting a jacket that’s extremely water resistant with exceptional breathability and functionality.

This jacket is also considered a relaxed fit.  Well what’s relaxed fit, because every company’s idea of relaxed fit is different.  Arc’teryx is not designed with the, “non- curvy” shape in mind, and I’m sure you’re going whaaa? Right about now.  But from personal experience I have found that these jackets just don’t fit me well.  But before you turn this jacket off completely understand my body type. For starters I’m 5,10”, 140 pounds and super leggy.  I also have a short torso and barely C cup size.  For some reason the Relaxed Fit by Arc’teryx just feels baggy in the stomach area. But then some women like a little extra space in stomach area and that would describe “relaxed fit” pretty well.  Reach wise, it tends to be a little long but the right length for multiple layers and gloves.

Fall-Into-Fall-Sentinel-Jacket-W-Chamisa
Who knew white could look so good?

Take- Away:

My takeaway is this.  If you want function with comfort then buy this jacket.  Just because it wasn’t for me doesn’t mean it can’t be for you and It’s a really nice jacket.  Plus, Arc’teryx has one of the best customer service reps I’ve ever chatted with so you no they back the quality of their product.  Have questions about this jacket, call us at 802-422-3234.

FULL FEATURE LIST:

Technical Features

  • Waterproof
  • Breathable
  • Durable

Construction

Fall-Into-Fall-Sentinel-Jacket-Women-s-Chamisa-Internal-Pocket
The guts look as good as the jacket.
  • Micro-seam allowance (1.6 mm) reduces bulk and weight
  • Tiny GORE® seam tape (13 mm & 19 mm)
  • GORE-TEX® three-layer construction

Design

  • Gathered fabric sections on front for aesthetic design
  • Women’s specific design and fit

Patterning

  • Anatomical shaping for fit and comfort
  • Articulated elbows
  • No-lift gusseted underarms

Hood Configuration

  • Helmet compatible StormHood™
  • Laminated brim
  • Stealth hood adjusters

Collar Configuration

  • Laminated chin guard

Zippers & Fly Configuration

  • WaterTight™ external zippers
  • Pit zippers for easy venting
  • WaterTight™ Vislon front zip with chin guard and wind flap
  • Webbing zipper pulls

Cuff & Sleeves Configuration

  • Laminated die-cut Velcro® cuff adjusters reduce bulk, and won’t catch or tear off
  • Large cuffs to fit over gloves

Hem Configuration

  • Laminated hem
  • Adjustable hem drawcord

Pocket Configuration

  • Internal chest pocket with laminated zip
  • Laminated sleeve pocket with laminated zip
  • Two high-volume hand pockets
  • Note: Our WaterTight™ zippers are highly water resistant, but not waterproof. We do not recommend keeping items in your pockets that may be damaged by moisture

Snowsport Features

  • Lift pass loop
  • Slide ‘n Loc™ snap closures on powder skirt enable jacket to be fastened to specific ski pants to prevent snow entry
  • Hidden Recco® reflector
facebooktwitter-birdinstagramgoogleyou-tubepinterestlinkedinemail

 

Posted on

NILS Barbara 2.0 Pant Gear Review

NILS Barbara 2.0 Pant is unexpectedly spectacular for long days on the slopes

 

NILS Skiwear is one of the first Fashion focused ski clothing companies to incorporate Gore-Tex into their collections. A smaller brand than many others, NILS has been able to incorporate high fashion accents into technologically comfortable winter skiwear. With the innovative design of the high waist, stretch bottom suit they soon began to dominate the stretch suit market. Over the course of the next several years NILS established a reputation as the best fitting women’s skiwear collection in the business and the product offering was extended to include sweaters, fleece, resort wear and petites. The universal active sportswear layering system and waterproof, breathable outerwear system is consistently regarded as the most complete offering for women in the industry.

The NILS Barbara 2.0 is no exception to the high standards NILS sets. The Barbara is they’re best selling women’s winter ski pant with a regular fit and mid waist rise. Designed to fit like your favorite pair of jeans, the Barbara is 20K/20K waterproofing to breathablity. This is the highest set standard for winter pants. Essentially the fabric is of a highest quality to resist water up to a certain pressure per square inch. For example brands like Arc’teryx are 20K rated.

Seams are critically seam sealed. Critical seam sealing is different than full seam sealing. Critical seam sealing essentially means that the critical seams have been taped for waterproofing. Full seam sealing can make pants more stiff and restrictive hence why NILS went with Critical seam sealing to allow the pants to move more freely. To top it all off, the zipper is a YKK zipper. High quality, durable and easy moving- YKK’s are the zippers of choice amongst winter ski companies.

Performance

We can go on and on all day about the tech of the Barbara, and some of you came here for that. But let’s be honest- if it doesn’t perform on the slopes, what’s the point in owning a pair? 60 grams of synthetic ecoloft insulation adds a good amount of warmth without the additional weight. Typically the heaviest winter pants you find (that still retain decent breathability ratings) is 100 grams. So 60 is slight above average for warmth.

When you first pull on the Barbara you’ll notice how stretchy it is. It moves with you and not against you. I personally like it, because it’s a quiet snowpant. Some pants with Gore-Tex Pro are stiff and in some ways restricting to move in. The Barbara is definitely not like that- and like your favorite pair of jeans, is incredibly comfortable. The best performance feature I found was the warmth factor. On those cold, slow chairlifts, my bum did not get cold. It was nice and toasty which is kind of a big deal. In comparison to other shell pants I’ve worn I was pleasently suprise by the warmth of the Barbara. The other nice thing too was that I wasn’t overheating. I was a happy warm and not sweaty.

Final Thoughts

For a good looking, functional pant that will keep you warm I think the Barbara is a great choice. I would recommend this pant to the skier who maybe won’t spend an entire day on the slopes. Someone who will take a few runs then maybe hang out in the base lodge. The seams are critically seam sealed and not fully taped which means, once they do get wet eventually water will sneak in. The other aspect of this pant is that though it is functional and oh so warm, it’s not necessarily technical. It feels like it’s more designed for the comfort and function aspects of skiing, not necessarily the technical aspects that sometimes come with the sport. So if you’re a weekend warrior, a mom with a VIP chair in the base lodge, or just someone wanting to get into a quality ski pant, I’d say the NILS Barbara 2.0 is your ticket.

Shop NILS Here

Patagonia Materials & Technologies

Patagonia Materials & Technologies

Patagonia Materials & Technologies embody a wide array of materials and fabrics. This material guide will help you navigate the various technologies used by Patagonia.

Hemp

Hemp is soft and breathable. It’s airy, natural and light. Our hemp collection is made from hemp blended with TENCEL® lyocell and organic cotton for strength and durability that exceeds that of linen. Once a major crop in the United States, industrial hemp is fast-growing and can be turned into fabric, food, building materials and other renewable products. A forbidden fiber in the U.S. since 1970, hemp has taken the heat for almost five decades. Hemp was federally illegal to grow for commercial purposes, making it risky for businesses to invest in a new crop that was incorrectly classified as a drug.

Organic Cotton

When we scrutinized fabric fibers to determine their environmental impact, we figured cotton was ”pure“ and ”natural,” made from a plant. We were right about the plant. As it happens, very little is pure or natural about cotton when it is raised conventionally. We learned this in the early 1990s when we started looking more closely into our cotton supply chains. At that time, fully ten percent of all agricultural chemicals in the United States were used to produce cotton, grown on just one percent of all major agricultural land. Every year, conventional cotton crops in California alone were doused with 6.9 million pounds of chemicals. And research showed that extensive and intensive use of synthetic fertilizers, soil additives, defoliants and other substances wreak terrible havoc on soil, water, air and many, many living things.

We also learned there was an alternative: organically grown cotton. Farmers have been growing cotton without harmful chemicals for years. Their yield is high, and the quality of the cotton they grow is equal to or better than conventionally grown cotton. Their methods support biodiversity and healthy ecosystems, improve the quality of soil and often use less water. Organic farming is more time consuming, requires more knowledge and skill, and, for now, costs more. But it’s worth it.

Once we had this knowledge, and the counsel of good friends in the environmental community, we believed we had no choice. In 1996, we began the exclusive use of organically grown cotton in all of our cotton products. Our decision was not without considerable financial risks, but we decided never to go back to conventional cotton, regardless of the outcome.

As it turned out, the move didn’t compromise quality. It provoked a fundamental change in our attitudes about agriculture. As part of our organic cotton program, hundreds of us took tours of cotton fields, and we saw for ourselves the dangers of pesticide use and the benefits of organic farming. Many of us have since shifted to buying organic foods and clothing.

At a glance, conventionally grown cotton is hard to distinguish from cotton that’s organically grown. To ensure we are buying cotton that is organic as defined by the USDA’s National Organic Program, we require certificates issued by an accredited third-party certification body. Certificates are issued to farms that follow organic practices, to factories that process organic cotton separately from conventionally grown cotton, and for shipments of organic cotton between different companies in the supply chain.

Recycled Nylon

Like polyester, nylon fiber is made from petroleum. Although we’ve been substituting non-recycled polyester for recycled versions for 20 years, only in the last five have we begun swapping out non-recycled nylon for its recycled replacement. For some reason locked deep in polymer chemistry, nylon is more difficult to recycle than polyester. After years of research, development, and testing, we’re finally finding some recycled nylon fibers that are suitable for apparel and can pass our rigorous tests of manufacturability and product quality.

Some of the recycled nylon we use comes from post-industrial waste fiber, yarn collected from a spinning factory, and waste from the weaving mills that can be processed into reusable nylon fiber. Another recycled nylon fiber we are experimenting with is re-created from discarded industrial fishing nets.

In 1993 we were the first outdoor clothing manufacturer to adopt fleece made from post consumer recycled (PCR) plastic soda bottles into our line. Twenty years later however, we’re still searching for a similar success story with recycled nylon. The challenge lies ahead of us, and we’re committed to discovering the best methods to recycle nylon fiber, but it appears this evolution will take many years.

In any case, incorporating as much recycled nylon as we can lessens our dependence on petroleum as a raw material source. It curbs discards, thereby prolonging landfill life and reducing toxic emissions from incinerators. It helps promote new recycling streams for nylon products that are no longer usable. And it causes less air, water, and soil contamination compared to using non-recycled nylon.

100% Recycled Down

Recycled Down is a mix of either 600- or 700-fill-power goose and duck down reclaimed from cushions, bedding and other used items that can’t be resold. It is hypoallergenic and offers the identical performance benefits to virgin down.

There was already a market in Europe for recycled down and feathers, but it took some time before we found the perfect partners who were able to meet our high-quality standards; the legwork really paid off. Both the collector and the processor we partner with are family-owned and share our values for high quality and uncompromising performance.

Our demand for high-quality Recycled Down has already led to an increase in supply. As other apparel companies follow our lead, we expect their demand will boost down recycling in even more countries. By plucking some of our down (and associated fabrics) from the trash, we reduce discards; help expand and add value to the recycling stream; and more fully realize our mission to “build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, and use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.”

REFIBRA™ lyocell

As part of an ongoing effort to continually tweak our production processes and reduce our impact on the environment, we’re using fabric made from wood pulp and recycled cotton scraps. Working with Lenzing, a manufacturer based in Austria, we created a collection of products made from REFIBRA™ lyocell fibers.

REFIBRA lyocell fibers are the result of two innovations involving wood and cotton. The wood pulp used in REFIBRA lyocell (TENCEL®) is a renewable raw material that comes from sustainably managed forests. By reducing the need to extract wood from new forests, this method of sourcing lowers the manufacturing impact. The addition of recycled cotton scraps not only diverts materials from the waste stream, it replaces some of the wood pulp, reducing the amount of virgin raw materials used.

REFIBRA lyocell is produced in a closed-loop production cycle; the solvents used to process the wood and cotton fibers are 99.7% captured and can be used over and over again; the only outputs are REFIBRA and water. The process also reduces the use of water by 95% compared to cotton fabric manufacturing and does not pollute the air, soil or water.

Recycled Polyester

We began making recycled polyester from plastic soda bottles in 1993–the first outdoor clothing manufacturer to transform trash into fleece. It was a positive step toward a more sustainable system–one that uses fewer resources, discards less and better protects people’s health.

Today, we recycle used soda bottles, unusable manufacturing waste and worn-out garments (including our own) into polyester fibers to produce clothing. And we offer recycled polyester in a lot more garments, including Capilene® baselayers, shell jackets, board shorts and fleece.

Using recycled polyester lessens our dependence on petroleum as a source of raw materials. It curbs discards, thereby prolonging landfill life and reducing toxic emissions from incinerators. It helps to promote new recycling streams for polyester clothing that is no longer wearable.

Recycled Wool

Patagonia incorporates numerous materials to make our clothing and gear, and all of them, including wool, have an environmental cost. For starters, the production of wool requires vast amounts of land for grazing the sheep. In addition, wool production demands energy, water and chemicals to convert the wool from fleece shorn off the sheep into clean fiber of consistent quality, and then into beautifully dyed wool products.

One way to lessen the impact of wool production is to recycle used wool. The practice of recycling wool dates back hundreds of years. After wool sweaters had been worn threadbare, they were collected and shredded into individual fibers and then converted into blankets. Patagonia’s recycled wool comes from this same process. Aided by modern-day quality controls, the wool goes through a meticulous sorting of materials into color categories prior to shredding. By selecting and blending colors of dyed wool fabrics and garments, we can completely eliminate the dyeing process, saving water and chemicals and eliminating the resulting wastewater.

TENCEL® lyocell

TENCEL® is a branded lyocell fiber that comes from the pulp of trees which is dissolved in a non-toxic organic solvent. The solution is extruded through fine holes to produce fiber and the solvent is recycled in a closed-loop process – more than 99% of the solvent is recovered and reused. We ensure that the fabric processing of TENCEL® lyocell fiber does not utilize any harmful chemicals (like formaldehyde) sometimes used to finish this type of fabric.

TENCEL lyocell can be used in place of other regenerated cellulose fibers such as viscose rayon. The benefits of using TENCEL lyocell include the traceable and sustainable origin of the wood pulp, and the use of non-toxic chemicals and solvents in the fiber processing. In addition, TENCEL lyocell is a high-tenacity cellulosic fiber, which gives high strength properties to the fabric.

Yulex

When we started making wetsuits in 2005, we had a simple purpose in mind: We wanted to apply our expertise in technical product design to build durable, high-performing suits in a less harmful way.

As we began our research into how conventional wetsuits were made, we found that neoprene, due to its complex and highly energy-intensive manufacturing process, was the most environmentally damaging component of a suit.

Neoprene, or polychloroprene, is a substance developed in 1930 that’s most commonly made by chlorinating and polymerizing butadiene, a petrochemical refined from crude oil. It’s been the base material for surf and dive wetsuits since the early 1950s, and there were no viable alternatives when we designed our first generations of suits.

To reduce the amount of neoprene we were using, we lined our suits with innovative fabrics that incorporated chlorine-free merino wool for additional warmth. We also switched to neoprene that was made with acetylene derived from limestone, instead petroleum-derived butadiene—but it too was non-renewable and required significant amounts of energy to produce, not to mention the effects of mining and transporting it. Compared to petroleum-based neoprene, there wasn’t much difference, and we realized we needed to keep searching for a better solution.

In 2008, we partnered with a company called Yulex to develop a renewable, plant-based replacement for neoprene. Originally avoiding hevea—the world’s main source of natural rubber—because of its association with deforestation in the developing world, we introduced the first wetsuits made with rubber from the guayule plant. But when we discovered that hevea was being grown on Forest Stewardship Council certified plantations in Guatemala, it changed our thinking—hevea rubber was the best-performing alternative to neoprene, and it could be sourced in a way that didn’t contribute to deforestation.

As of Fall 2016, the Yulex® natural rubber in our wetsuits comes from sources that are Forest Stewardship Council® certified by the Rainforest Alliance. After being tapped from hevea trees, the raw latex is refined by our partners at Yulex in a proprietary process that removes over 99% of impurities—including the proteins that cause latex allergies—and results in a stronger, non-sensitizing natural elastomer.

We were excited to find a renewable material that performed as well, or better, than traditional neoprene. Our environmental assessments revealed another benefit that was just as encouraging—because the polyisoprene polymer was produced in trees instead of factories, using solar energy instead of generated electricity, up to ~80% less climate-altering CO2 was emitted in the manufacturing process when compared to traditional neoprene.

Still the material of choice for a wide range of products with demanding performance requirements, such as airplane tires and medical gloves, natural rubber is both stronger and more flexible than its synthetic substitutes. Its strength, elasticity and consistent stretch transfer superbly into wetsuits—meaning that not only are we not contributing to deforestation, Yulex natural rubber is a step forward for performance, too.

Most importantly, since only 0.5% of the world’s rubber supply currently comes from FSC certified sources, we hope our choice will motivate other businesses to incorporate more sustainable practices in their supply chains.

Reclaimed Cotton

Too often, the life of a cotton garment, whether it’s conventional or organic, ends at the landfill. Growing, spinning and weaving leads to cutting and construction and that leads to consumer use which eventually can lead to the dump. Factoring organic farming practices into the equation is certainly preferable to industrial agriculture, but farming still uses a lot of water and leaves a carbon footprint from preparing the soil, cultivation and harvest.

Thanks to a partnership with the TAL Group, one of the larger garment manufacturers in the world, we have been able to take cotton consumption and twist it closer to the elusive closed—loop. Since 2011, the TAL Group has been saving their cotton scraps by sweeping the floors of their factories in China and Malaysia—saving hundreds of tons of useable cotton in the process.

This cutting-room scrap is then spun into fully functional fabrics. Basically, the leftovers from 16 virgin cotton shirts can be turned into one reclaimed cotton shirt. When you consider the volume of work being done at the TAL Group’s facilities, it adds up to a lot of saved resources.

Reclaimed cotton is neither bleached nor dyed and is traceable from raw material to retail store. We blend this unique fiber with virgin organic cotton in the Men’s Reclaimed Cotton Hoody and Women’s Reclaimed Cotton Crew.

Denim

Patagonia® Denim uses only 100% organic cotton grown without GMO seeds, synthetic fertilizers, pesticides or herbicides. An innovative dyeing process enables us to reduce dramatically the use of water, energy and chemicals and produce less carbon dioxide compared to conventional denim dyeing processes. And our denim jeans are Fair Trade Certified™ for sewing.

Organic Cotton
Denim fabric is made with cotton—a natural fiber. But conventionally grown cotton is one of the dirtiest crops on the planet. That’s why since 1996 we’ve used only organically grown cotton farmed without the usual mix of synthetic pesticides, herbicides, defoliants and fertilizers that can pollute water and air. Organic cotton agriculture uses non-GMO seeds and leverages nature-based solutions to manage pests and build healthy soil. All of the cotton in our denim jeans is organically grown.

Dyeing
When it comes to giving denim its signature blue, most dye houses use synthetic indigo dye applied on huge production lines that use a lot of water and energy. Indigo doesn’t adhere readily to denim, which makes the dyeing, rinsing and garment-washing process resource intensive. We once used indigo to color Patagonia Denim, but now we employ Archroma Advanced Denim Technology, an innovative dye process that colors it with sulfur dyestuffs that bond more easily. This results in much shorter production lines that use 84% less water, 30% less energy and emit 25% less CO2 compared to conventional denim dyeing processes. And because we don’t sandblast, bleach or stonewash our denim to make it look worn, we avoid the serious social and environmental downsides of doing so.

Fair Trade Certified™ Sewing
Our denim jeans are Fair Trade Certified® for sewing. Partnering with Fair Trade USA is one of the ways we’re helping garment workers get closer to a living wage. For each piece of Fair Trade Certified clothing, we pay a premium workers can use to improve their communities and elevate their standard of living. The workers decide how to use the money. They might choose to build a school or a health center, create a scholarship or take it as a bonus.

Responsible Wool Sourcing

At Patagonia, we work hard to develop materials that meet our quality standards, and, when it comes to products sourced from animals, ones that prioritize the humane treatment of animals and restoring the health of the land. To that end, we developed a strict supplier evaluation process based on the following pillars:

  • Animal Welfare: Our baseline requirement for wool suppliers is certification to the Responsible Wool Standard (RWS). Without this step, a farmer cannot be considered approved. As of Fall 2018, all of the wool in our products is RWS certified, from farm to finished product.
  • Responsible Land Management: Our approach includes the RWS’s strong land management requirements, which Patagonia played a lead role in developing based on our previous experiences with regenerative grazing practices. These requirements pertain both to grasslands and other biotic communities where sheep may be raised, including biodiversity protection, soil management and pesticide and fertilizer use.
  • Quality: Quality has always been and will continue to be a major pillar in our requirements for any material sourcing, including wool.

Moreover, we created the Patagonia Wool Standard (PWS) with above and beyond requirements that are the North Star for our preferred suppliers. You can view the Patagonia Wool Standard by clicking here.

We are proud of what we have accomplished so far with our current partners; knowing that our requirements have challenged farmers to change century-old traditional wool ranching practices. This takes time, commitment and careful planning for sustainable improvement. We will continue to partner closely with our current suppliers, and to seek new ones who want to join us on this journey. For more information on our wool efforts please click here.

bluesign® Approved Fabric

Patagonia has worked with bluesign® technologies since 2000 to evaluate and reduce resource consumption in our materials supply chain, and to assist us in managing the chemicals, dyes and finishes used in the process. bluesign technologies, based in Switzerland, works at each step in the textile supply chain to approve chemicals, processes, materials and products that are safe for the environment, safe for workers and safe for the end customers.

Textile manufacturers that become bluesign® system partners agree at the outset to establish management systems for improving environmental performance in five key areas of the production process: resource productivity, consumer safety, water emissions, air emissions, and occupational health and safety. System partners regularly report their progress in energy, water, and chemical usage and are subject to on-site audits.

The bluesign system is based on input-stream management. Chemicals are assigned to one of three categories: blue– safe to use; gray–special handling required; and black–forbidden. The bluesign system helps factories properly manage gray chemicals and replace black chemicals with safer alternatives.

In 2007, Patagonia became the first brand to join the network of bluesign system partners. We committed to the highest level of consumer safety and the continuous improvement of environmental performance in our textile supply chains by applying the bluesign system to help conserve resources and minimize impacts on people and the environment. Our progress and encouragement have inspired more suppliers and other brands to join; there are now over 400 brands, manufacturers and chemical suppliers that are bluesign system partners.

Any fabric that’s bluesign approved offers the highest level of consumer safety by employing methods and materials in its manufacture that conserves resources and minimizes impacts on people and the environment.

DWR

DWR (durable water repellent) fabric finish repels light rain and snow and decreases dry times. When DWR is used in conjunction with a waterproof/breathable barrier, the DWR finish keeps the outer fabric from becoming saturated, enabling the breathable barrier to do its job. Patagonia has long relied on a DWR with perfluorinated compound (PFC) but we have been searching diligently for an alternative because of its harmful environmental impacts.

H2No® Performance Standard

While the tests we create in the fabric lab can’t simulate Mother Nature perfectly, we find they’re extremely useful in helping us develop and then consistently compare the performance characteristics of differing fabrics. In our testing lab at Patagonia, we use highly controlled tests to simulate actual-use on our garments.

We test a fabric’s waterproofness in three ways: we simulate light rain, prolonged rain, and finally we force water through the face of a fabric. We test breathability by measuring a fabric’s Moisture Vapor Transmission Rate (MVTR). And we test durability by subjecting fabrics to a “Killer Wash.” Killer Wash is Patagonia’s wet flex and abrasion test that simulates years of use in drenching conditions.

If a fabric passes our rigorous tests, it achieves H2No® Performance Standard status. H2No® Performance Standard is Patagonia’s benchmark for waterproofness, breathability and durability. Backed by our Ironclad Guarantee, H2No® Performance Standard ensures the highest level of long-term waterproof performance. These products undergo the most rigorous testing in the industry. The H2No Performance Standard for waterproof shell garments is 20,000 MM before, and 10,000 MM after our Killer Wash test (per JIS L 1092 B).

It’s important to note that Patagonia does not just rely on lab tests when we’re developing and choosing fabrics. We also send our ambassadors and testers into the field to punish these garments in every possible condition to expose any potential weakness in materials or construction. We reject or redevelop fabrics and garments that do not meet our standards. Whether it’s a bomber 3-layer alpine shell or a pared-down rainwear piece, the same rules apply.

2-layer H2No® Performance Standard shell fabrics are completely waterproof, windproof and breathable. They combine a water-repellent shell fabric with a waterproof/breathable membrane. They also have an internal Taffeta or mesh lining for increased durability and next-to-skin comfort.

2.5-layer H2No® Performance Standard shell fabrics are waterproof, windproof, breathable and highly packable. They combine a water-repellent shell fabric with a waterproof/breathable membrane and protective top coat barrier designed to allow the garment to be constructed without the need for an internal lining fabric. A distinctive raised print layer is applied for decreased surface tension and increased moisture management.

3-layer H2No® Performance Standard fabrics are waterproof, windproof and breathable by virtue of an advanced combination of elements: a water-repellent shell fabric, a waterproof/breathable membrane, and an ultralight knit backer. The entire fabric package is highly packable, comfortable next-to-skin, and built to withstand long term exposure in extreme environments.

HeiQ® Fresh Durable Odor Control

Sweat alone is odorless–bacteria metabolizing fat and protein in a moist, warm environment is actually what causes garments to smell after extended use.

  • HeiQ Fresh durable odor control is harmless to your skin and body.
  • HeiQ Fresh will last for the lifetime of the garment. This technology will allow you to wear your garment a few times before it needs washing. By washing less, you save time, water and energy.
  • HeiQ Fresh is bluesign® and OEKO-TEX® approved.

*Reaction mass of titanium dioxide and silver chloride

Regulator® Insulation

Regulator® fleece insulation provides phenomenal compressibility, light weight warmth and moisture transport, whether used alone or as part of a layering system.

The lofted hollow-core fibers of Regulator fleece insulation conserve body heat while allowing body moisture to wick uninhibited during sweat-inducing activity. They’re also lightweight and highly compressible for packing – a boon when every inch of pack space counts.

Regulator Fleece Insulation provides exceptional breathability to keep you dry on the inside when you’re pushing the pace. And while Regulator fleece provides the same amount of warmth as a much bulkier fleece, it does so with lighter, more compressible materials. Since you stay both dryer and warmer, you’re able to maintain your comfort over a wide temperature range, which results in fewer layering changes and a lighter, less bulky pack.

Regulator fleece Insulation may be worn alone in milder weather. When nasty weather looms, they complement our Climbing, Skiing and Snowboarding shells and Performance Baselayer pieces.

UPF Fabric

Lacking fur, feathers or scales, we humans have to think up clever ways to protect ourselves from the sun. Products with the UPF designation provide built-in sun protection that won’t wear off.

To achieve sun protection, Patagonia takes a varied approach, depending on the degree of protection desired and the fabric used. Elements of the strategy can range from yarn selection to fabric construction to the use of special finishes (especially for light colors which generally provide less protection).

Clean Color Collection

We’ve taken the byproducts of food waste, dried beetles and the poop of silkworms (among other things) to create a line of clothing dyed with natural ingredients. Why the alchemy? Because dye is dirty. And even though many of our synthetic dyes use less water, energy and CO2 when compared with conventional processes, we’re always trying to do better. For the Clean Color Collection, we’re experimenting with a line of plant-based dyes, sourced from 96% renewable resources. The colors change and fade over time, but that’s part of what makes these dyes unique.

Mulberry
Plants that yield green dyes are, ironically, incredibly rare. We use dye made from Chinese silkworm excrement—its rich green comes from the insects’ diet of fresh mulberry leaves.

Carmine
The red powder for this dye is produced from cochineal beetles, which feed on prickly pear cacti. It was once so valuable, Emperor Montezuma levied a special tax on his subjects to be paid in the prized insects.

Pomegranate
The rinds of the pomegranate produce a rich yellow brown and were once used to dye leather. Our grey dyes are produced from pomegranate byproducts of food production.

Citrus Brown
Bitter orange peel is often used as an herbal remedy. We take the production residue and use it to make a rich brown dye.

Palmetto Green
Palmetto trees can serve as wharf pilings and scrubbing brushes, and the buds are often consumed as hearts of palm. Our palmetto green comes from herbal industry byproducts.

Indigo
Used in everything from the wrappings of ancient Egyptian mummies to the paintings of Matisse and the original American flag, the story of indigo is as fierce as its color. Our indigo comes from India—a dye source since the days of the Silk Road. Though the richness fades with wash and wear, this change is part of what makes each garment unique. Washing with cold water and limiting sun exposure both help to slow down this process.

2.5-layer H2No® Performance Standard Shell

2.5-layer H2No® Performance Standard shell fabrics are completely waterproof, windproof, breathable and highly packable. Because 2.5-layer H2No® Performance Standard shell fabrics are so lightweight and compressible, they’re excellent choices for backpacking, alpine climbing and backcountry skiing and snowboarding. They combine a water-repellent shell fabric with a waterproof/breathable membrane and protective top coat barrier without the need for a protective lining fabric, which makes it light weight and highly packable. Additionally a distinctive raised print layer is applied for decreased surface tension when layering and increased moisture management.

2.5-layer H2No® Performance Standard shell fabrics are coated with DWR (durable water repellent) fabric finish that repels light rain and snow. In conjunction with a waterproof/breathable barrier, the DWR finish keeps the outer fabric from becoming saturated so that the breathable barrier can do its job.

All products bearing the H2No mark have been vigorously tested for durability in our 24 Killer Wash, a process used to simulate years of use and abuse in a short period of time. This process consists of exposing the fabric to severe thrashing in a modified washing machine for a continuous 24 hours.

H2No® Performance Standard is Patagonia’s benchmark for waterproofness, breathability and durability, which ensures a high level of long-term performance backed by our Ironclad Guarantee. H2No Performance Standard products undergo the most rigorous testing in the industry. The H2No Performance Standard for waterproof shell garments is 20,000 MM before, and 10,000 MM after our Killer Wash test (per JIS L 1092 B).

We also send our ambassadors and testers into the field to punish these garments in every possible condition to expose any potential weakness in materials or construction. We reject any garment that does not pass our tests, regardless of technology or fabric supplier.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: 2-Layer H2No® Performance Standard Shell

2-layer H2No® Performance Standard shell fabrics are completely waterproof, windproof and breathable. They’re designed for a wide range of uses, from backpacking to skiing and snowboarding. 2-layer H2No® Performance Standard shell fabrics utilize a taffeta or mesh lining rather than a bonded scrim to protect the waterproof/breathable barrier. The lining increases the garments wicking ability, durability and next-to-skin comfort.

2-layer H2No® Performance Standard shell fabrics are coated with DWR (durable water repellent) fabric finish that repels light rain and snow. In conjunction with a waterproof/breathable barrier, the DWR finish keeps the outer fabric from becoming saturated so that the breathable barrier can do its job.

All products bearing the H2No mark have been vigorously tested for durability in our 24 Killer Wash, a process used to simulate years of use and abuse in a short period of time. This process consists of exposing the fabric to severe thrashing in a modified washing machine for a continuous 24 hours.

H2No® Performance Standard is Patagonia’s benchmark for waterproofness, breathability and durability, which ensures a high level of long-term performance backed by our Ironclad Guarantee. H2No Performance Standard products undergo the most rigorous testing in the industry. The H2No Performance Standard for waterproof shell garments is 20,000 MM before, and 10,000 MM after our Killer Wash test (per JIS L 1092 B).

We also send our ambassadors and testers into the field to punish these garments in every possible condition to expose any potential weakness in materials or construction. We reject any garment that does not pass our tests, regardless of technology or fabric supplier.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: 3-Layer H2No® Performance Standard Shell

3-layer H2No® Performance Standard fabrics are completely waterproof, windproof and breathable by virtue of an advanced combination of elements: a water-repellent shell fabric, a waterproof/breathable membrane bonded with an ultralight knit backer. The entire fabric package is highly packable, waterproof, windproof, breathable and built to withstand long term exposure in extreme environments. Garments made 3-layer H2No® Performance Standard fabrics are designed for prolonged use in extreme weather.

3-layer H2No® Performance Standard shell fabrics are coated with DWR (durable water repellent) fabric finish that repels light rain and snow. In conjunction with a waterproof/breathable barrier, the DWR finish keeps the outer fabric from becoming saturated so that the breathable barrier can do its job.

All products bearing the H2No mark have been vigorously tested for durability in our 24 Killer Wash, a process used to simulate years of use and abuse in a short period of time. This process consists of exposing the fabric to severe thrashing in a modified washing machine for a continuous 24 hours.

H2No® Performance Standard is Patagonia’s benchmark for waterproofness, breathability and durability, which ensures a high level of long-term performance backed by our Ironclad Guarantee. H2No Performance Standard products undergo the most rigorous testing in the industry. The H2No Performance Standard for waterproof shell garments is 20,000 MM before, and 10,000 MM after our Killer Wash test (per JIS L 1092 B).

We also send our ambassadors and testers into the field to punish these garments in every possible condition to expose any potential weakness in materials or construction. We reject any garment that does not pass our tests, regardless of technology or fabric supplier.

Celebrating Five Years of Fair Trade

Five years ago we started with just a few Fair Trade™ certified styles—today we are proud to offer more Fair Trade styles than any other apparel brand. This means over 50,000 workers have benefited from our commitment to the Fair Trade Certified™ program. We’re excited to celebrate five years of partnership with Fair Trade USA and the progress we’ve made with offering products in every category.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies

Fair Trade Pays

More than 50,000 workers have benefitted from Patagonia’s commitment to the Fair Trade Certified™ program.

You may be familiar with the “Fair Trade Certified” symbol and its assurance that some of the money spent on a bag of coffee or bar of chocolate goes directly to its producers and stays in their community. Patagonia, in partnership with Fair Trade USA, has been making clothes that provide the same benefit since 2014, and today we are proud to offer more Fair Trade products than any other apparel brand.

This is how it works: We pay a premium for every Patagonia item that carries the Fair Trade Certified™ label. That extra money goes directly to the workers at the factory, and they decide how to spend it. This is not a top-down program. In each factory, a democratically elected Fair Trade worker committee decides how the funds will be used. Workers have chosen to use the premiums to fund community projects, like health care programs or a child care center; to purchase products they could otherwise not afford, like a TV or a stove; or to take a cash bonus.

But that’s not all. The program also promotes worker health and safety as well as social and environmental compliance, and encourages dialogue between workers and management. For example, upon learning that Fair Trade committee members were considering spending some of their premium to build a cooking facility, management at Pratibha Syntex, one of our supplier factories in India, recognized it as something they should provide and paid for the new kitchen from company funds.

For Patagonia, Fair Trade is our first step on the path toward paying living wages in our supply chain. We don’t own any of the factories that make our products, so we have limited control over how much workers receive. Through Fair Trade, we can supplement workers’ wages and provide them with tangible benefits that improve their lives.

For our customers, Fair Trade is a way to make a conscious choice for a better world. By choosing to purchase a Fair Trade garment, you are casting a vote for good values, an all too rare opportunity in our global economy.

What makes a factory Fair Trade Certified?

  • Rigorous standards for health and safety
  • Respect for the environment
  • No child or forced labor
  • Maternity and paid leave
  • Community empowerment
  • Additional money back to workers

“The benefits of the program have exceeded our expectations,” says Thuy Nguyen, the Patagonia manager of social and environmental responsibility who works on the Fair Trade program. “In addition to the premiums raising wages, our factories have reported improved worker morale and engagement. Since workers actively participate in the program, they understand and appreciate what Fair Trade can do. Few social programs have such a sweeping impact.”

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: 4-Layer Wader Fabric

Patagonia developed the innovative, 4-layer fabric construction for our waders in order to increase breathability, move moisture away from the body, increase abrasion resistance, and decrease the weight of the fabric. We were successful on all fronts.

Our exterior fabrics are all 100% polyester microfibers that are densely woven for durability and puncture resistance. On one side of this face fabric we apply our H2No® waterproof coating for superb waterproof/breathable performance. On the other side we apply a Hydrophilic laminate. Hydrophilic means water loving and this layer pulls moisture away from the person wearing the waders so it can be passed out through the coating and exterior shell. To protect the hydrophilic laminate we apply a soft polyester tricot lining (this is the lining you feel inside the wader).

Our new tricot lining is the key to the fabric’s performance. It’s 27% lighter than our previous fabric package with a 42% increase in abrasion resistance. We were also maintained a soft, supple drape to the fabric which is critical to how well the waders move with your body. Our 4-layer waders are extremely comfortable.

Finally, we apply a DWR (durable water repellent) treatment on the exterior face fabric. This is one of our most important innovations in wader technology. We tested all DWR’s available and ultimately chose to apply NanoSphere® DWR as the first line of defense in keeping these waders waterproof.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: Patagonia Traceable Down

Patagonia is the world’s first brand to be certified to both the Responsible Wool Standard and the Traceable Down Standard.

Patagonia Traceable Down is traced from parent farm to apparel factory to help ensure that the birds that supply it are protected by the strongest animal welfare and consumer assurance standards. These include robust requirements in all areas of the birds’ lives, and especially protects against force-feeding and live-plucking.

We began working in 2007 to trace our down supply chain in the interest of sound animal welfare. Since fall 2014, all of the virgin down we use to insulate our products has met our own Patagonia Traceable Down Standard. In our Fall 2017 product season, we went a step further and announced that all our virgin down was also certified to the Global Traceable Down Standard (Global TDS), Advanced certification level by NSF International.

In 2018, Patagonia went even further and achieved certification at the brand level, becoming the first outdoor brand to be certified to the Advanced Global Traceable Down Standard. This added level of certification covers our internal product traceability systems as well as our distribution center. This allows certification of not only the down material in our products but the full final product itself.

How and why do we do this?

Our tracing process starts by auditing the parent farms, where birds are raised to produce eggs. This is where the highest risk for live-plucking occurs, as animals live there up to four years. Even though we don’t get our down from birds at parent farms, we feel obliged to look out for their welfare as they are an essential part of the down supply chain. This is what sets us apart from other brands also concerned about animal welfare.

The eggs produced at parent farms are transferred to other farms, where hatchlings are raised for their meat. We audit these farms to ensure sound animal welfare practices. Down is a byproduct of the food industry, and the down we buy comes exclusively from slaughterhouses. After it is collected from geese that have been killed for their meat, we follow it through washing, sorting and processing facilities to ensure proper traceability and segregation from untraceable down. We continue our audits all the way to the garment factory, where we make sure our certified traceable down is stored separately from that of other brands, and used only in our clothing. Audits then continue to our distribution center, where the down garments arrive, are checked in, stored and packaged to send out to our customers following the Traceable Down Standard brand requirements. It’s a lot of work. But this is how we help ensure the birds whose down we use in our products have been treated humanely.

The assurance of sound animal welfare and full chain of custody inherent in the Global Traceable Down Standard is the result of thousands of hours of work from our executives, designers, material planners, sourcing department, distribution center, suppliers and corporate social responsibility team. It was neither cheap nor easy, and we had to reexamine our strategy and business operations in the process. But building a long-lasting product that helps you stay warm in good conscience is a legacy of which we are extremely proud.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: 2-Layer GORE-TEX Fabric

Garments made with two-layer GORE-TEX fabric are durably waterproof, windproof and highly breathable. These garments provide reliable weather protection and maximum comfort for a wide range of activities. We combine GORE-TEX fabrics with a variety of outer fabrics so you can choose what’s most important to you: weight, abrasion resistance, breathability, etc.

The construction of 2-Layer GORE-TEX Products is unique. A GORE-TEX membrane is bonded to an outer material, then combined with a free-flowing lining which results in a soft, lightweight garment that keeps you dry and lets you move freely.

The GORE-TEX membrane has 9 billion pores per square inch, with each pore 20,000 times smaller than a water droplet. These tiny holes are too small for water and wind to pass through from the outside, which is how W.L GORE & Associates guarantees you’ll stay dry and warm in a garment made with GORE-TEX fabric. But these same pores are large enough for moisture vapor to pass through, so your body’s perspiration is able to escape and you won’t feel clammy or uncomfortable inside your jacket.

One of the chief environmental benefits of GORE-TEX fabrics is their longevity. GORE-TEX fabrics are incredibly durable, and unlike some “waterproof/breathable” fabrics that can lose waterproofness after repeated laundering, flexing, abrasion, or exposure to body oils or insect repellent, the waterproofness and breathability of GORE-TEX fabric is guaranteed under any conditions you may encounter. The durable performance of GORE-TEX fabrics allow them to last longer, which is the most effective measure for making an environmentally sound choice. Durability enables a long and useful lifetime of the finished product, resulting in substantial savings of raw materials and energy that would be otherwise required to manufacture multiple units of shorter-lived products.

While no manufacturing operation is completely free from emissions and environmental impact, the Fabrics Division of W. L. Gore & Associates makes significant efforts to minimize the effect of their manufacturing processes on the environment. They fulfill a high level of environmental standards in all their manufacturing plants globally with controls in place that meet or improve upon the local regulatory demands (e.g., air pollution control devices, solvent-free adhesives, manufacturing waste recycling, and waste water treatment). The environmental impacts of GORE’s manufacturing processes are regularly assessed and controlled by an Environmental Management System according to ISO 14001. This environmental manufacturing standard was globally implemented in their fabrics manufacturing plants in 2010.

All of GORE’s fabric manufacturing sites have passed the bluesign® screening and have implemented the bluesign® standard, which verifies that the manufacturing processes are carefully managed and equipped with the best available environmental controls. bluesign technologies has developed an independent and rigorous standard for the safety and environmental performance in making textile products.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: 3-layer GORE-TEX Shell

Garments made with lightweight three-layer GORE-TEX fabric are durably waterproof, windproof and very breathable. These garments provide reliable weather protection and maximum comfort for a wide range of activities. We combine GORE-TEX fabrics with a variety of outer fabrics so you can choose what’s most important to you: weight, abrasion resistance, breathability, etc.

With a 3-layer construction that includes GORE-TEX membrane sandwiched between a soft outer material and a knit polyester backing material for added durability, these garments keep you comfortable and protected from the elements without adding extra bulk or weight. Garments made with three-layer GORE-TEX fabric are the ideal solution for outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy demanding activities in a wide range of weather conditions.

The GORE-TEX membrane has 9 billion pores per square inch, with each pore 20,000 times smaller than a water droplet. These tiny holes are too small for water and wind to pass through from the outside, which is how W.L GORE & Associates guarantees you’ll stay dry and warm in a garment made with GORE-TEX fabric. But these same pores are large enough for moisture vapor to pass through, so your body’s perspiration is able to escape and you won’t feel clammy or uncomfortable inside your jacket.

One of the chief environmental benefits of GORE-TEX fabrics is their longevity. GORE-TEX fabrics are incredibly durable, and unlike some “waterproof/breathable” fabrics that can lose waterproofness after repeated laundering, flexing, abrasion, or exposure to body oils or insect repellent, the waterproofness and breathability of GORE-TEX fabric is guaranteed under any conditions you may encounter. The durable performance of GORE-TEX fabrics allow them to last longer, which is the most effective measure for making an environmentally sound choice. Durability enables a long and useful lifetime of the finished product, resulting in substantial savings of raw materials and energy that would be otherwise required to manufacture multiple units of shorter-lived products.

While no manufacturing operation is completely free from emissions and environmental impact, the Fabrics Division of W. L. Gore & Associates makes significant efforts to minimize the effect of their manufacturing processes on the environment. They fulfill a high level of environmental standards in all their manufacturing plants globally with controls in place that meet or improve upon the local regulatory demands (e.g., air pollution control devices, solvent-free adhesives, manufacturing waste recycling, and waste water treatment). The environmental impacts of GORE’s manufacturing processes are regularly assessed and controlled by an Environmental Management System according to ISO 14001. This environmental manufacturing standard was globally implemented in their fabrics manufacturing plants in 2010.

All of GORE’s fabric manufacturing sites have passed the bluesign® screening and have implemented the bluesign standard, which verifies that the manufacturing processes are carefully managed and equipped with the best available environmental controls. bluesign technologies has developed an independent and rigorous standard for the safety and environmental performance in making textile products.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: 3-Layer GORE-TEX Pro Shell

Garments engineered with GORE-TEX Pro fabrics are built for maximum ruggedness and are ideal for extreme and extended use. They are tough, extremely breathable and provide waterproof and windproof protection to outdoor professionals and serious outdoor enthusiasts.

GORE-TEX Pro products have a 3-layer construction that comprises a special high performance GORE-TEX membrane, bonded to a tough outer material and a specially developed robust inner lining. The benefit: no movement between the three layers, which means less wear and tear, and even greater durability. This construction can also be combined with insulation to keep you both dry and warm.

The GORE-TEX membrane has 9 billion pores per square inch, with each pore 20,000 times smaller than a water droplet. These tiny holes are too small for water and wind to pass through from the outside, which is how W.L GORE & Associates guarantees you’ll stay dry and warm in a garment made with GORE-TEX fabric. But these same pores are large enough for moisture vapor to pass through, so your body’s perspiration is able to escape and you won’t feel clammy or uncomfortable inside your jacket.

One of the chief environmental benefits of GORE-TEX fabrics is their longevity. GORE-TEX fabrics are incredibly durable, and unlike some “waterproof/breathable” fabrics that can lose waterproofness after repeated laundering, flexing, abrasion, or exposure to body oils or insect repellent, the waterproofness and breathability of GORE-TEX fabric is guaranteed under any conditions you may encounter. The durable performance of GORE-TEX fabrics allow them to last longer, which is the most effective measure for making an environmentally sound choice. Durability enables a long and useful lifetime of the finished product, resulting in substantial savings of raw materials and energy that would be otherwise required to manufacture multiple units of shorter-lived products.

While no manufacturing operation is completely free from emissions and environmental impact, the Fabrics Division of W. L. Gore & Associates makes significant efforts to minimize the effect of their manufacturing processes on the environment. They fulfill a high level of environmental standards in all their manufacturing plants globally with controls in place that meet or improve upon the local regulatory demands (e.g., air pollution control devices, solvent-free adhesives, manufacturing waste recycling, and waste water treatment). The environmental impacts of Gore’s manufacturing processes are regularly assessed and controlled by an Environmental Management System according to ISO 14001. This environmental manufacturing standard was globally implemented in their fabrics manufacturing plants in 2010.

All of Gore’s fabric manufacturing sites have passed the bluesign® screening and have implemented the bluesign standard, which verifies that the manufacturing processes are carefully managed and equipped with the best available environmental controls. bluesign technologies has developed an independent and rigorous standard for the safety and environmental performance in making textile products.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: Polartec® Power Shield® Pro

Designed to strike the optimal balance between weather protection and breathability, Power Shield Pro offers the best soft-shell weather resistance without compromise to breathability. Patagonia has specifically designed our Polartec Power Shield Pro shells to meet the needs of our athlete team and our most technical core customers. Polartec Power Shield Pro combines never before seen levels of air permeability with durable hydrostatic resistance to keep you dry both from within and from out.

How does it work?
Polartec Power Shield Pro fabrics feature a smooth, tightly woven face for great abrasion resistance, and a polyester back for a high warmth-to-weight ratio. The membrane in the middle enables the fabric to block 99% of the wind. The remaining 1% circulates within the fabric which greatly enhances moisture vapor transmission, improving breathability and reducing the risk of heat stress buildup. Polartec Power Shield fabrics have the best breathability in the soft shell market. In fact, Polartec Power Shield Pro fabrics are 30-50% more breathable than windproof soft shells in dynamic or active conditions.

Highly Breathable and Highly Water-Resistant
The biggest advance of the new Polartec Power Shield Pro membrane is the addition of real water resistance, measured through a hydrostatic head. Polartec Power Shield Pro delivers an initial 5,000mm hydrohead (ISO 811, AATCC 127) and remains durably water resistant to a minimum of 3,000mm for life. This level of water resistance exceeds the requirement for seam sealing on a waterproof breathable shell (3psi or 2100mm) so you can be assured of its performance. The combination of water resistance and breathability of Polartec Power Shield Pro offers a great advance in soft shell comfort.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: Polartec® Windbloc®

Polartec® Windbloc® fabrics block 100% of the wind and offer maximum protection from the cold and the elements. The soft hand, stretch, and DWR (durable water repellent) finish combine to make this the highest quality, most comfortable windproof fleece product on the market.

How does it work?
Polartec® Windbloc® combine the warmth of Polartec® thermal fabrics with a polyurethane barrier membrane that allows moisture vapor transmission and is completely windproof and water resistant, eliminating the need for a windbreaker or additional shell. This reduces the weight and number of layers needed to protect and insulate.

These fabrics are very durable, quiet, and non-pilling, and have enhanced stretch and recovery, making them appropriate for outerwear when weather protection is paramount. Polartec® Windbloc® fabrics are ideal when the activity level is low or intermittent, and when cold and inclement weather demands high-performance outer protection.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: PrimaLoft® Insulation

We use PrimaLoft® insulation inside insulated garments for its warmth, compressibility and soft comfort. While the human body uses energy to stay warm, PrimaLoft insulation uses a proprietary microfiber structure to help the body retain warmth and conserve energy.

PrimaLoft insulation uses fibers just a fraction the diameter of a human hair to form a tight collection of air pockets that trap heat from your body and keep the cold out, providing an excellent warmth-to-weight ratio. When insulation gets wet, it can lose these air pockets and, consequently, its insulating properties. PrimaLoft ultra-fine fibers were developed to be water resistant so your insulation stays drier and maintains its insulating properties. The ultra-fine fibers create a tight surface tension that won’t allow water to pass through. Unique, permanent fiber finishes repel water and keep the insulation drier, even if water is forced into the insulation.

Fiber diameter directly influences softness. For example, if you compare canvas fabric to silk fabric you’ll see that the finer silk fibers result in a softer material. So PrimaLoft fibers have been engineered to be ultrafine and mimic the softness of down. Thus, these ultrafine fibers mimic the compressibility of goose down and are breathable, allowing moisture vapor to be transported through the fibers and away from the skin.

PrimaLoft® Gold Insulation Eco

PrimaLoft® Gold Insulation Eco was born out of the challenge to do better for the environment. Modeled after PrimaLoft’s highest-performing synthetic insulation, Gold Eco provides excellent warmth for its weight and maintains 98% thermal efficiency when wet, all while using 55% post-consumer recycled fibers. In 2016, we updated all our products that used PrimaLoft Gold insulation to Gold Insulation Eco.

PrimaLoft® Silver Insulation Hi-Loft

This insulation is uniquely built with two different sizes of fibers, one for high thermal values and packability, the other for increased loft. It offers these advantages in a comfortable yet durable package. This insulation considers the fundamentals–delivering 85% retention of insulation value, and offering excellent thermal efficiency when dry.

Patagonia Materials & Technologies: WINDSTOPPER® Fabric

WINDSTOPPER® Fabric provides total windproofness while maintaining maximum breathability to keep you comfortable in a wide range of weather conditions and activities.

WINDSTOPPER fabrics are soft and lightweight to provide insulating warmth without added weight. They allow perspiration to easily escape, which keeps you warm and dry from the inside, even when you’re working hard. They’re also water resistant, and shed snow and water. Finally, they dry quickly.

WINDSTOPPER® high-performance fabrics are made by laminating a  windproof membrane to the inside of a functional fabric to prevent windchill while protecting the warm yet highly sensitive microclimate that surrounds your skin. The WINDSTOPPER membrane has 1.4 billion micropores in every square inch to let water vapor from perspiration escape virtually unhindered, even when you’re working at maximum intensity.

How does it work?
The WINDSTOPPER membrane is an ultrathin protective layer that is laminated to a lightweight fabric, making the fabric package totally windproof. WINDSTOPPER membrane is made from the versatile polymer PTFE (polytetrafluorethylene) which is expanded to create a microporous structure. These micropores are 900 times larger than water vapor molecules, allowing perspiration to pass through unhindered. This means that the WINDSTOPPER membrane adds total windproofness to any textile without perceivably restricting its initial breathability or weight.

Posted on

Patagonia 100% Recycled Down

100% Patagonia Recycled Down

Patagonia Recycled Down is a mix of either 600- or 700-fill-power goose and duck down reclaimed from cushions, bedding and other used items that can’t be resold. It is hypoallergenic and offers the identical performance benefits to virgin down.

There was already a market in Europe for recycled down and feathers, but it took some time before we found the perfect partners who were able to meet our high-quality standards; the legwork really paid off. Both the collector and the processor we partner with are family-owned and share our values for high quality and uncompromising performance.

Our demand for high-quality Recycled Down has already led to an increase in supply. As other apparel companies follow our lead, we expect their demand will boost down recycling in even more countries. By plucking some of our down (and associated fabrics) from the trash, we reduce discards; help expand and add value to the recycling stream; and more fully realize our mission to “build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, and use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.”


Patagonia apparel is an american clothing company that manufactures clothing for people who enjoy an active lifestyle. The company was founded by Yvon Chouinard in 1973, and is based in Ventura, California. Its logo is the skyline of Cerro Fitz Roy in Patagonia. The company believes in living and active, outdoor lifestyle as well as giving back to the environment. They actively engage in 1% for the planet. 1% for the Planet is an alliance of businesses that understand the necessity of protecting the natural environment. They understand that profit and loss are directly linked to its health, and are concerned with the social and environmental impacts of industry.
Posted on

The North Face Technology Process

Tested In Labs. Proven On Expeditions. Trusted By Athletes.

The North Face Technology Process begins with our world-class athletes. Their suggestions, recommendations and new equipment ideas provide the inspiration and challenges that drive the research and development of advanced materials, innovative design and construction. The most crucial step involves testing both in our laboratories and with our athletes on expeditions around the world.

Original Words and Images By The North Face

Research & Development

Technologies

Innovation


Research & Development- The North Face Technology Process

The most crucial step involves testing both in our laboratories and with our athletes on expeditions around the world. Our athletes often recommend an innovation that’s outside the bounds of existing technology. The North Face® Research, Design and Development team accepts their challenges and turns to the laboratory for new fabrics and components. Our teams of designers and fabric technicians must turn those revolutionary raw materials into gear that maximizes an athlete’s ability to survive and succeed in the most severe weather conditions.

STEP 1: Research & Design in Conjunction With World-Class Athletes

Athletes who constantly pursue their own limits help us push the limits of apparel and equipment design and technology. The North Face® Athlete Team gives us constant feedback on the clothing and equipment they depend on for success and survival in their adventures. We hear from our athletes through gear evaluations and regular athlete input sessions.

STEP 2: Advance Material Research & Development

We partner with the world’s most innovative leading materials engineers to create the technically advanced fabrics needed to develop clothing and equipment that meet our high standards. For example, The North Face®, in conjunction with W.L. Gore, created the concept and helped to launch PacLite™ the most compressible, lightest weight GORE-TEX® shell fabric available – weighing only 3.2 ounces per yard. By adhering this new GORE-TEX® laminate to our proprietary, extremely lightweight nylon substrate, we succeeded in creating a shell material perfectly suited for the extreme lightweight requirements demanded in high-altitude expeditions.

STEP 3: Innovative Design & Construction

Exploring the frontiers of technology for better fabrics and components is only the beginning of the life cycle of a new piece of gear. A great example of this is our C130 Tent Test. Our entire tent line was tested against our competitors by placing them in back of a C130 plane. The plane’s four engines produce 13,000 ft/lbs. of torque and are capable of producing wind speeds in excess of 80 mph and unlike wind-tunnel tests, the propellers can create wind currents that are irregular and multi-directional. The results speak for themselves – our tents outperformed all the competition.

STEP 4: Laboratory Tested & Expedition Proven

We save the most critical step in our product development process for last. In addition to subjecting our products to a tortuous battery of laboratory tests, we send our apparel and equipment on extended athlete expeditions to learn how new products perform under the true test of the great outdoors. After receiving feedback, we refine each product until it receives approval from our world-class athlete team.


Technology- The North Face Technology Process

FUTURELIGHT™

OUR MOST ADVANCED BREATHABLE-WATERPROOF TECHNOLOGY.

Disruption is in our DNA. For over 50 years, The North Face has pushed the boundaries of what’s possible. The next chapter, our innovative FUTURELIGHT™ fabric, is here to revolutionize the outdoors yet again.

Like most revolutions, it started with an idea. Ours began with an on-mountain insight from alpinist, Andres Marin, who was on expedition in full kit. After repeatedly adjusting shells with changing weather, he asked, “What if there was gear that was alive?” What if one piece of gear could keep him dry in the rain, warm in the cold, and breathed when he needed it to?

We took those “what ifs” and challenged ourselves to find a solution. Our design teams worked closely with our world-class athletes to create a radically product. The end result? Our most advanced breathable-waterproof technology ever.

BENEFITS

  • Ultra-thin nanomembrane creates airflow while keeping water out for better breathability
  • Features innovative waterproofing that was rigorously tested to withstand the harshest weather conditions
  • Soft, lightweight and nimble for movement without constraints
  • Tested by our elite athlete team in the world’s most extreme environments for proven durability
  • Face and back layers sustainably crafted using 90% recycled materials

 

 

 

 

 

GOOSE DOWN

THERMAL INSULATION

Using only the highest quality goose down in all of our products, The North Face® tests each lot of down at three stages of production for loftiness, moisture resistance and ability to regain loft after compression. The fill power of goose down is an indicator of two important features: warmth-to-weight ratio and compressibility, both critical to retain warmth and furnish comfort. True fill power is measured by placing one ounce of goose down in a graduated cylinder and measuring the volume the down occupies in cubic inches. The North Face® products are insulated with exclusive, high-fill power goose down ranging from 550 to 900 fill, which represents the highest quality down commercially available.

BENEFITS

  • Superior warmth and comfort
  • Lightweight insulation
  • Increased loft than lesser fill downs (900 + 800 only)
  • Highest quality, high-fill power goose down

 

THERMOBALL

THE NEW SYNTHETIC ALTERNATIVE TO DOWN

The North Face™ developed a partnership with PrimaLoft® to offer a new synthetic alternative to down. ThermoBall™ is a revolution in insulation technology. Unlike traditional, continuous-filament synthetic insulations, the small round PrimaLoft® synthetic fiber clusters closely to mimic down clusters; trapping heat within small air pockets to retain warmth.

BENEFITS

  • Lightweight
  • Phenomenal warmth in cold and wet conditions
  • Packs neatly into zipper pocket (not all styles)
  • Insulates even when wet

GORE-TEX

WATERPROOF

The North Face® partners with GORE-TEX® to deliver the industry’s most innovative and highest performance waterproof, windproof and breathable weather protection. GORE-TEX® fabrics lead the industry in providing durable waterproof, breathable protection. The GORE-TEX® membrane is completely impervious to rain, sleet and snow, while allowing perspiration to pass through it from within. Tiny pores in the GORE-TEX® membrane allow perspiration to escape while preventing water from entering.

BENEFITS

  • Lightweight
  • Breathable
  • Protection in rain and snow
  • Ideal for snowboarding, skiing, and climbing

 


Innovation- The North Face Technology Process

FUSEFORM

STAY DRY AND MOVE SEAMLESSLY

Our proprietary fuseform construction technique vastly improves on our own innovative breakthroughs of the past. It’s a revolutionary weaving process that blends thicker, more-durable threads with lighter, lower-density fibers in high-wear zones, effectively reducing overall weight and creating a seamless transition from tougher to lighter zones.

BENEFITS

  • Innovative design enhances protection and function
  • Seamless fabric construction eliminates panel overlays
  • Trimmer fit allows better range-of-motion
  • Fabric density: 70 Denier
  • Fabric density: 40 Denier
  • Seamless fusion

 

Posted on

Arc’teryx Layering Guide

Wondering if your shell will fit over your favorite down hoody? Our layering guide will tell you.

The Arc’teryx Layering Guide outlines and explains the various uses and purposes of an outerwear setup. From Baselayers all the way up to technical shells, we’ve got your back and an explanation to boot.

Why Layering?

Layers are the instruments of keeping you dry, warm and using your energy efficiently. Put into the right systems, a good sequence of layers provides you with weather protection, moves moisture away from your skin, conserves or dissipates heat, and does this in the least amount of time.

Use the layering guide to select your system and to understand how it works together. Function and comfort increase from effective layering.

The way that layers sit next to each other optimizes temperature regulation and moisture management inside your clothing, by allowing the fabric technologies to function at maximum performance. Proper layering also permits textiles to move freely over each other, so you don’t experience restriction or chafing. Having an efficient system adds up to more time outdoors, safely and comfortably pursuing and pushing your activities of choice.

Arc’teryx Layering Guide Layering Key

Using the number assigned to your product, refer to the illustration to discover additional layers you can add to your system.

Product compatibility: Determine where your first layer sits and move outward to layer over top; move inward to layer underneath. Products with the same number will not be compatible.

Base layers have the smallest numbers and sit closest to the body. Hardshells have higher numbers; they are your outermost layer.

Sample Systems

 

 

BASE LAYER

Your first layer, worn next-to-skin. In many ways, this layer determines your other layers.

Lighter weights are best for warm conditions and/or high output levels. Heavier weights for cool conditions or lower output.

Wool retains its warmth when wet and has natural anti-odor properties. Synthetics are lightweight, dry quickly and can be more abrasion resistant.

 

 

 

 

MID LAYER & FLEECE

Air permeable layers that provide some warmth and protection, in addition to moisture management.

Down fill mid layers have the greatest warmth-to-weight ratio. They are highly efficient, packable and light. Best suited to cool and dry conditions.

Synthetic fill has the advantage of staying warm when damp, and durability in varied environments. These mid layers are less compact than down, more versatile.

Hardfleece has a fleece interior bonded to a weather resistant outer fabric. These mid layers are highly air permeable, removing moisture but retaining warmth. Good for high output, cold conditions and moderate precipitation.

Fleece is a thermal garment with air permeability, that can be worn as a standalone layer. Fleece offers high comfort, less weather resistance.

Consider your base layer and your typical body temperature when selecting your mid layer. If you are often cold, choose a mid layer with less air permeability. If your base layer is warm, but you want weather protection, a lighter mid layer may work best.

 

 

 

 

 

INSULATION

When selecting insulation type, consider weight and weather conditions. Down provides the highest warmth-to-weight value and packs small, but it is best suited to cool and dry conditions. Synthetic materials remain warm when damp, are more abrasion resistant but less compact and heavier than down.

Each type of insulation is available in a range of warmths, from superlight to severe cold.

 

 

 

 

 

SHELL JACKETS

Shells are the most weather protective layer, most often worn on the outside of all other layers. Evaluate your environment, expected output level and typical conditions when making your selection.

GORE-TEX® shells are fully waterproof, windproof and breathable. Available in a range of fabric technologies, applicable to specific use and environments.

Windshells are lighter weight, wind and weather resistant. Best suited to dry conditions, or minimal precipitation.

Softshell refers to a four-way stretch textile with an inherently durable smooth outer surface. Weather resistant and highly abrasion resistant, our range of softshells deliver varied degrees of warmth and protection.

Composite garments are composed of more than one fabric technology. This is done to achieve optimal performance in targeted areas. For example, GORE-TEX® sleeves and shoulders for waterpoof protection, combined with a softshell torso to improve temperature regulation.

 

 

 

INSULATED SHELL JACKETS

A one jacket system for cold, wet environments. Weatherproof and insulated, these outer layers are streamlined and can be lighter than an equivalent two-piece system.

GORE-TEX® and down insulated jackets combine the premium lightweight warmth of down insulation with a streamlined, fully weatherproof outer shell. This construction also protects the down from moisture.

GORE-TEX® and synthetic insulated jackets have simplified construction, to create lightweight, fully waterproof warmth. Can be worn in the worst conditions and remain warm even if damp.

 

 

 

Free Shipping* Free shipping on all orders over $99
Money Back Guarantee 100% money back guarantee
Shop Online 24/7 Need help? Call. View store hours.
© Basin Sports 2020
.
  • © 2020 Basin Sports, Killington, VT, All rights reserved.
  • Site Designed by Green Mountain Marketing & Advertising, Inc.